Marjorie Morrell
Marjorie Morrell
Marjorie Morrell
Marjorie Morrell
Marjorie Morrell
Marjorie Morrell

Obituary of Marjorie L. Morrell

In Loving Memory, Margie L. Morrell. “Just another soulless atheist in search of world peace and harmony!” On Thursday, May 7, 2020, Marjorie "Margie" (née Bonner) Morrell, 77, in the care of Hospice, ceased to exist on this plane as her body fulfilled her mind’s last wish to sleep deliciously. She was kept comfortable in her final days by her sister, Maz, who held her hand, reminisced, and listened to Kris Kristofferson croon “Thank You For A Life.” Ever the organizer, she did a remarkable job in life preparing herself (and her family) for these moments, her wishes reading more like a to-do list than scattered notes from a "Death with Dignity" seminar. Diagnosed with terminal cancer 19 months ago, in her last year she was self-tasked with keeping a positive attitude in the face of mounting challenges that tested her mental fortitude and physical endurance. Born to Charles and Doris Bonner in Philadelphia, PA, she was the second of five children and spent most of her early years in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, before starting her own family with her loving husband of 53 years, Richie, as she called him. Those who knew her best know the world has lost one of the most virtuous and genuine spirits we ever had the privilege of knowing. When Richie passed away last year, she credited her fierce independence for her ability to cope as well as she did. Additionally, she was able to find solace in relationships with friends that prevented her from dwelling on her loss. Sadly, it took his passing for her to recognize the affection others had for her, as shown by their unprecedented outpouring of love and support. It was her lifetime of being there for others that came back in the karmic tsunami that she most certainly deserved to experience. Of all of the things she was known as, she always said that her role as mother was the one she was most proud of. It has been said that she is the mom that many would have traded for, if given the chance. She raised four children who could not have asked for a better mentor, supporter, and role model, each of whom are thankful she lived long enough to have called her a friend as well. She made sure that each knew how much they were loved and that she would extend herself in any way possible at any opportunity. We love you scads, Mom. Outside of the immediate family, most called her a true friend and everyone who knew her has a great "Margie story." She would welcome anyone to sit, talk, and laugh at the expandable kitchen table where there was always room for one more. While there, you might have heard about the time she rode her bike the entire length of the Erie Canal. Or she may have explained how she was moved to action by the administration's delay in replacing Andrew Jackson on the U.S. $20 bill, and purchased a rubber stamp with Harriet Tubman’s profile, used it to overlay Jackson’s portrait, and would circulate them to anyone who would accept one. Or about her involvement with civil rights or anti-war movements. You never knew what you could learn, sitting around that table. After her kids were old enough, she entered the workforce as a chef at Yaddo, the artists' retreat in Saratoga Springs. After retiring in 2000, she spent fifteen years volunteering with various organizations. She helped hurricane victims in Texas for the American Red Cross. Worked at a local soup kitchen twice a week. And most recently, she gave time to the Refugee Welcome Center in Albany. Engaging with the people she worked with and learning about their struggles gave her the ultimate appreciation for diversity and compassion for those in need. She also gave countless hours to local community events in Round Lake and New Orleans. Her lifetime of travel took her, and usually Richie, around the world. They drove around much of East Africa, lived in France for a short time, and visited their kids living in foreign lands. After retirement, they set off to find a place to spend winters out of the New York cold. This quest took them to locales as varied as the Florida Keys, Spain, Dominican Republic, and eventually, New Orleans. Falling in love with the Algiers Point section, they knew they would spend their remaining winters in Louisiana and summers in New York. She maintained that Paris was her favorite city in the world. But, it was being in New Orleans that made her happiest in the last part of her life. Her car’s bumper sticker read: "NOLA 'til ya die." Fittingly, she spent most of her last winter there and had returned to her first love of Round Lake mere days before being admitted to the hospital for the last time. She is survived by her children, Sim (Eleonora) of Clifton Park, NY, Damon (Krissy) of Round Lake, NY, Jackie of Bangkok, Thailand, and Amanda (Brian) Huprich of Galena, OH; her brothers, Bill (Pat) Bonner of Highland Park, NJ, Ron (Marge) Bonner of Kerhonkson, NY; and sisters Maz (H.B.) Nettleton of Willow Park, TX and Mari Brand of Cleburne, TX. “Mimi’s” seven grandchildren were a great source of joy for her, as well. She was predeceased by her parents. Her friends and family can take comfort in knowing her final days were tranquil. If she has been surprised, no doubt, by the existence of an afterlife, we can rest assured she is reuniting with Richie, sitting at the kitchen table, sipping a cup of black coffee, reading the newspaper, while arguing about whose turn it is to pick the next movie. They will go to the matinee...and both nap through it. Afterwards, she will sit on the beach reading a book but will be back in time for Judge Judy. Essentially: she lived, she laughed, she loved, she left. To fulfill her last requests, there will be no graveside service as she donated her mortal remains to Albany Medical Center's Anatomical Gift Program. However, in the ultimate injustice to the woman whose life deserved nothing more than to have her literal last wishes respected, unbeknownst to her, current COVID-19 restrictions prevent the program from taking any donations at this time. To that end, any part of her body was made available for donation. She was cremated immediately. For many years, her wish was to have her ashes dumped in the "County Waste" garbage truck in a small, family-only, curbside ceremony. In later years, she agreed to have her ashes interred at Albany Rural Cemetery alongside Richie--which will be arranged. A community gathering in her honor will be announced at a later date. In lieu of flowers, a donation to www.hospicefoundation.org may be made in her name. Marjorie L. Morrell August 12, 1942 - May 7, 2020 Thank you for a life that I'd call happy Overlooking all that we've been through When it comes to loving I've been lucky Everything I am I owe to you Thank for the little girls you gave me Thank you for them bouncing baby boys Thank you for the sadness That you saved me from the madness, baby All I'm crying now are tears of joy Thank you for that burning sun that's rising Golden in the air that smells so sweet Thank you for that empty far horizon That opens to a new eternity Thank you for a life that I'd call happy Overlooking all that we've been through When it comes to loving I've been lucky Everything I am I owe to you Kristofferson, K. (2006) “Thank You For A Life”. On This Old Road. New West Records.
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